By Peter Bernstein, Senior Editor
04/09/2014

Here is a number that is sure to live in infamy, CVE-2014-0160.

It is the official reference number for what has not so affectionately been named the “Heartbleed Bug,” a reference to the OpenSSL's implementation of the TLS/DTLS (transport layer security protocols) heartbeat extension (RFC6520). This is what we all commonly seen by us as https, what is supposed to an indication that we are on a secure Web site.

By Peter Bernstein, Senior Editor
04/08/2014

It may be a term even seasoned professionals in the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) space may not be familiar with, but the “Critical Communications Market” is, in a word, critical. It involves providing next generation communications in areas such as transportation, utilities and government, where accessibility and reliability are table stakes, and where in the wireless area in many if not most instances there is dedicated spectrum.

By Rob Enderle, President and Principal Analyst, Enderle Group
04/08/2014

Last week, at Microsoft Build we got a far better sense for Cortana, Microsoft’s next generation phone A.I. system. She is expected to be a generation more advanced than Siri and Google Now - both of which have been in the market for some time and have improved since launch. Currently, Siri is generally better at tasks and may have an edge with car integration while Google Now is better for web searches (as you might imagine) but Cortana is expected to be smarter than both - which should start a war between these vendors for who has the smartest artificial intelligence. Let’s talk about what happens when your smartphone actually gets smart.

By Rob Enderle, President and Principal Analyst, Enderle Group
04/08/2014

Amazon’s Fire TV was launched last week and I spent all weekend playing with it. I mostly used Amazon Prime and Netflix and found the device amazingly good. With a quad core Qualcomm Snapdragon processor at its heart, this product screamed and for $100, particularly for folks looking to cut the cord to their cable company, it is as much of a game changer as the Kindle was for reading. Strangely the device reminds me a lot of the early iPod and Palm Pilot products because it is incredibly simple and intuitive to use and set up. Let me walk you through it.

By Peter Bernstein, Senior Editor
04/07/2014

Hopefully every day all of us find out something new that is really interesting. Today should be such a day for most of us, as it was for me, when I was made aware of two new things. First was the fact that on April 2, all of the 24 GLONASS satellites—which comprise Russia’s equivalent of the GPS system—actually failed simultaneously and were inoperable for roughly 13 hours, and that this did not make the TV news rounds or appear on virtually any of the tech press circuits. The second thing I learned—and this is how I was informed about the first—is that there is an Australian company, Locata, which has a terrestrial solution to deal with such potentialities and can provide GPS for those hard to reach places.

By Peter Bernstein, Senior Editor
04/07/2014

As the communications service provider (CSP) business both converges and becomes even more hotly competitive, there is a need to assure not only that the network infrastructure is operating in a highly accessible and reliable manner, but that the services running on that infrastructure are also performing flawlessly. In fact, to assure that customers are getting what they expect and are paying for, along with providing them superior quality of service (QoE), CSPs increasingly are looking for solutions that give them visibility and control end-to-end of all aspects of how their services are delivered and experienced.

By Steve Anderson, Contributing TechZone360 Writer
04/07/2014

It's been just over a year and a half since Microsoft called in Nancy Tellem, formerly of CBS Corp., to build what amounted to a complete television operation from the ground up. In that time, Tellem has been busy and now six new shows are set to be released from the company. Featuring names like Sarah Silverman, Seth Green, and the World Cup, Microsoft's status as a full-service entertainment powerhouse is about to get its first big test.

By Peter Bernstein, Senior Editor
04/07/2014

There are two big trends impacting Communications Service Providers (CSPs) that have a tendency to not get the headlines they probably should.

The first is that CSPs around the world, looking at the explosion of data on their networks which is actually accelerating, can no longer sustain “all you can eat” business models. They must move to metered service models in order to:

By Drew Hendricks,
04/07/2014

Ten years ago, small business marketing looked considerably different from today’s marketing landscape. The entire practice has since changed with the rise of the Internet.

Google was born in 1998, nearly 16 years ago. Ten years ago, in February 2004, Zuckerberg launched Facebook. In 2005, Google launched Analytics and YouTube was founded. In 2006, Twitter saw its first tweet. In 2008, Groupon started crowdsourcing the online coupon. In 2012, Pinterest put pictures on an online map. And now, “69 percent of brands have a presence on Pinterest” (Social Media Today). Having a web presence is now essential to small business marketing.

By Tara Seals, TechZone360 Contributor
04/07/2014

Consumer viewing of TV programming and movies anytime and anywhere is growing, along with the demand for more devices and more online content. Meanwhile, consumers’ willingness to pay for better access to that content is reshaping the media and entertainment landscape and driving media companies like Disney to invest in innovation and technology transformation.

A recent Accenture survey found that 25 percent of respondents intend to purchase a connected TV in the next 12 months. And, another 11 percent intend to replace an existing connected television, while 12 percent plan to purchase a tablet, expanding the market of addressable screens even further.

By TMCnet Special Guest,
04/07/2014

We’ve all experienced that moment of outrage when we think Facebook changed our privacy settings without our consent. Most of us want to keep some level of control over our personal details, posts, likes and dislikes, shared pictures, videos and more, and don’t take kindly to changes we perceive as throwing our sacred privacy setting balance into disarray. With this in mind, here are five myths about Facebook privacy you should know about.

By Oliver VanDervoort, Contributing Writer
04/07/2014


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We are in an age when some of the most tech-savvy companies in the world are worrying more and more about the security of their own products and services. In that vein, Yahoo has recently admitted that it is taking additional security measures and using advanced data encryption in order to keep a number of its offerings locked up tight.

The company also said it plans to encrypt services that had not been enjoying the heightened level of security through encryption. Among those services and offerings that Yahoo is planning to upgrade is its Yahoo Messenger application.

By Doug Mohney, Contributing Editor
04/04/2014

Microsoft is gunning for lower-cost products -- and good for them. The biggest area of growth across the next decade are the next billion connected in developing markets. Clearly, there's a strategy here and hopefully it won't get subsumed by short term Wall Street demands.

This week, Microsoft announced at its Build 2014 conference it was providing Windows for free to hardware partners for Windows Phones and tables smaller than 9 inches in size. It puts the software giant in parity with Android's relative costs after, oh, anywhere from five to seven years of free distribution, but more importantly recognizes the concept of razors and blades when it comes to devices and services.

By Joe Rizzo, TechZone360 Contributing Writer
04/03/2014

Ever since the Industrial Revolution, the economy has been tied into new and evolving technologies and how they affect certain industries. When the automobile because the mode of transportation instead of horse and carriage, it led to a variety of other work opportunities all designed around keeping that new automobile on the road.

This seems to be true throughout the ages. As technologies grows, evolve and change they bring with them a growth of new businesses and industry changes. This, in turn does tend to lead to economic growth. We are seeing that cities, such as New York City, are in the midst of rapid transformation, especially where the economy is concerned.

By Steve Anderson, Contributing TechZone360 Writer
04/03/2014

vRecently the topic of net neutrality got some extra attention as a vote coming up in the European Parliament was set to examine the topic and see just how users would be able to access all the content that's offered by the Internet as a whole. While there have been some issues on this front, especially as content goes from straight text to video and interactive sources with an accompanying increase in bandwidth required, the European Parliament made it clear with its vote that all data, regardless of type, should be equally accessible.

By Erik Linask, Group Editorial Director
04/03/2014

By most measures, the PC/laptop market has been dwindling of late, thanks to the growing abundance of mobile devices – specifically, tablets – which are replacing much of the PC functionality for many users. The truth is, the majority of that decline is in the consumer space, while business users still rely on their laptops for real productivity. As much as tablet vendors would like us to believe their lightweight, versatile, smaller form factor products allow users to remain as productive as ever, that simply isn’t the case.

By Kasey Schefflin-Emrich, TechZone360 Contributing Writer
04/03/2014

Two years ago Google's People Innovation Lab began its first long-term study on the field of work, called gDNA, with the purpose of gaining a better comprehension on how to foster a great work environment and acquire high-performing employees, as well as determining the effect happiness has on work and the effect work has on happiness.

By Doug Mohney, Contributing Editor
04/02/2014

Fixed line telephony is still a $150 billion business, according to a Tweet from Alan Quayle at the WebRTC Summit this week. But that pot of money is slowly declining as revenues shift. I know AT&T and Verizon want to get rid of all their legacy copper plant as soon as possible, but the more honest question is, what will they replace it with in areas where they do not have copper?

By Erik Linask, Group Editorial Director
04/02/2014

Chinese telecom giant Huawei’s challenge isn’t product quality – it has for long been recognized globally among the top carrier network vendors. But, as a three-year-old relative newcomer to the enterprise market, it faces a challenge not only from market leaders, like Cisco and HP, but also from the perception that it is a carriers’ vendor. Add to that additional political obstacles in the U.S., in particular, and the task at hand seems challenging, at best.

By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
04/01/2014

BT hopes the creation of a new quadruple play offer including Long Term Evolution mobile services, fixed network voice, video entertainment, and high speed access will boost revenue per account and slow fixed network voice line churn rates.

About 60 percent of U.K. consumers buy a bundle of some sort, often the two-product bundle of fixed network voice and high speed access, according to Ofcom, the U.K. communications regulator. Some 27 percent of U.K. households buying a bundle purchase the voice-plus-broadband package.

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