By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
08/14/2014

By 2020, half of all TV content viewed globally will happen on-demand, instead of live and linear, Ericsson predicts.

Also, in 2020 mobile broadband users will will exceed eight billion subscribers, while fixed network broadband will be used by one billion consumers at home, representing around 75 percent of digital TV homes, Ericsson predicts.

At the same time, the subscription TV subscriber services market alone will be worth $460 billion, not including the value of advertising.

By Carrie Majewski (née Schmelkin), Director of Content Marketing, Content Boost
08/14/2014

If you were to ask Louis Richardson, IBM worldwide storyteller and enthusiast, what it takes to prepare your business for the next generation of technology, he would say it’s about changing culture and mindset before you can change existing business processes.

As Richardson explained during an ITEXPO panel Wednesday titled “Leading Change: Taking Your Business and Technology in the Next Generation,” IBM spends a lot of time interacting with different business executives, exploring the concept of adoption and change management, especially as it relates to technology. As an example of how you have to change behavior before you can change existing technology practices, Richardson talked about his previous experience as director of information management for a large insurance company that handled claims adjustments.

By Paula Bernier, Executive Editor, TMC
08/13/2014

Ashar Baig, a research director at the well-respected analysis firm Gigaom Research, today at ITEXPO offered his perspective on the future (and the recent past) of cloud services.

Cloud is mainstream today, noted Baig, driven forward by users’ desire for lower cost solutions, better scalability, and business agility – in that order. Concerns about compliancy, security, vendor lock in, and other factors are sometimes, but obviously not always, cloud inhibitors, however.

By Peter Bernstein, Senior Editor
08/13/2014

The wrap-up keynote session of Day 2 of ITEXPO in Las Vegas was in a word, “scintillating.” I will admit that is not a word heard very often in our industry, but it aptly describes the session where TechZone360 Group Editorial Director Erik Linask led a discussion on topics of intense interest, with three CIOs with big jobs and great insights on where IT is now and where it is going.

Sharing their views with the ITEXPO attendees were David Gustafson, CIO, for the State of Nevada; Bill Schrier, CIO for the State of Washington and the former CTO for the City of Seattle, WA; and Dr. Lori Temple, Vice Provost for IT, UNLV. While this panel was unusual in that its focus was on the IT challenges of government agencies and a large public institution of higher learning, the lessons to be learned in many ways are universally applicable, despite the unique requirements of the verticals represented.

By Matt Paulson, TechZone360 Contributing Writer
08/12/2014

Twitter has gone under a series of extensive overhauls as of late, replacing many of its top executives in order to match and fit to a new vision. But what exactly does that new vision entail? The social media giant has left several clues as to what that new direction may in fact be, ranging from a greater presence on TV and printed media as opposed to just the Internet to a greater presence in International markets. The company has been rather secretive about these plans until now, where it appears that the company may shift focus towards enhancing direct messaging capabilities.

By Steve Anderson, Contributing TechZone360 Writer
08/12/2014

There are a lot of users on Twitter; reports say there are 271 million monthly active users (MAU) on Twitter as of the end of June alone. There's just no getting around that one. But even Twitter knew last month, reportedly, that not all of Twitter's users were represented by actual breathing human beings, and now, the true extent of Twitter's bot problem may have been revealed: as many as 23 million of Twitter's users may actually be bots.

By Tara Seals, TechZone360 Contributor
08/12/2014

Home router giant NETGEAR has released its Nighthawk X6 platform, a tri-band Wi-Fi 802.11ac router that delivers speeds up to 3.2Gbps. It offers segmentation as a differentiator: it uses behind-the-scenes intelligence to segment slower and faster devices into the most appropriate Wi-Fi band for network load balancing.

The box also supports NETGEAR Beamforming+, a signal-focusing technology that improves Wi-Fi connections by locking onto a wireless device on the network and pinpointing Wi-Fi signals directly at the device. As consumers move, Beamforming+ adjusts for distance.

By Allison Boccamazzo, Managing Content Producer
08/12/2014

Today, everything is digitized, from banking and social media to more avant-garde cases like the television or the car you buy. This makes security a dicey issue, what with the majority of end users being unaware of the myriad of things that can happen each and every time a laptop is opened or a smartphone is powered up. Content security is a must for enterprises that are looking to stay out of the crossfire—the kind that Target recently encountered and made headlines for—but concrete security processes can also throw a wrench into achieving a seamless customer experience. Too tightly restricted processes can hinder productivity on the customer’s end.

By TMCnet Special Guest,
08/12/2014

Our working lives are at a point of inexorable change. Technologies are disrupting our traditional work patterns to such a degree that soon the term ‘office’ will become obsolete. In its place will be a new model for work – a flexible and collaborative environment where the mobile device is the tool around which everything else will flow.

Much of this change has been triggered by the new breed of worker, #GenMobile, who are putting mobility at the centre of their working and personal lives.

By TMCnet Special Guest,
08/11/2014

For some 30 years, until Steve Ballmer changed it, Microsoft’s corporate mission statement was remarkably concise: “To put a computer on every desk and in every home.”

Bold and direct? Yes. Simple? Not really.

Think about it. When Bill Gates wrote it—and he did, personally—Microsoft did not make computers and never had. Not a single one. So was Gates just perverse in his choice of mission statement?

By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
08/11/2014


New rumors that AT&T might buy Eircom, coupled by growing interest on the part of some European carriers in Brazil, plus America Movil’s acquisition moves in Austria and SoftBank’s purchase of Sprint, illustrate a developing global game of musical chairs for the largest telcos.

A search for growth drives the moves, even if cases where carriers choose to divest earlier acquisitions. In most cases, such sales are driven by a need to shore up balance sheets, allowing capital to be redeployed in other growth initiatives.

By Oliver VanDervoort, Contributing Writer
08/08/2014

While most people assume that the biggest battles Apple has to fight are those against Google, Microsoft would love to be considered a rival as well. That might be the reason Bill Gates’ firm is looking to open a retail store on New York City’s Madison Avenue. This wouldn’t be the first Microsoft retail store in the Big Apple, but it would be the first that would be located so close to its computing competitor.

By Oliver VanDervoort, Contributing Writer
08/08/2014

While Facebook has come under fire for a number of moves over the last few months, it seems likely their most recent will receive plaudits from a number of users. Earlier this week, the social networking site announced two important changes to its Platform Policies under games and proper use. The new policy gives developers 90 days to honor the new rules.

By Oliver VanDervoort, Contributing Writer
08/08/2014

At this point in the Internet age, we all know just how annoying spam emails can be. A new report shows that while the Prince of Nigeria is sending out an inordinate amount of pleas for money, it’s the United States that is the king of the spam email. Sophos has released a report showing that a massive 24.2 percent of all spam mail came from inside the U.S. France and China come in second and third, and they are close to each other, but a far distance from the United States as they account for 6.7 and 6.2 percent of all spam sent.

By TMCnet Special Guest,
08/07/2014

Across industries and geographies, companies continue to adopt “Work from Home” programs, giving employees increased flexibility and bolstering work/life balance. Recent government data reports 10 percent of American workers spend at least one day a week clocking in from home. The demand for flexibility is high and according to a survey conducted by Kona/SodaHead.com, 70 percent of workers want to work from home, and that number jumps up to 81 percent for workers age 35 to 44.

By Christopher Mohr, TechZone360 Contributing Writer
08/07/2014

T-Mobile announced on Wednesday that it had passed Sprint as the top provider of prepaid mobile phone service in the U.S. It is part of a larger trend of consumers shifting away from contract plans to plans that allow them to purchase fixed amounts of data and voice service, a trend that may have an adverse effect on Apple.

According to a T-Mobile press release, it has 15.64 million prepaid customers, slightly ahead of Sprint, which has 15.19 million. AT&T has the third spot with 11.34 million prepaid customers; Verizon is a distant fourth place with 6.04 million.

By Kasey Schefflin-Emrich, TechZone360 Contributing Writer
08/07/2014

College students around the nation are expected to take an estimated $49 billion worth of electronics to campuses this year, and unfortunately, these devices posses a high risk of being broken or cracked.

A new study by SquareTrade, an extended warranty service provider for consumer electronics and appliances including mobile devices, laptops and tablets, surveyed 541 U.S. college students using Google Consumer Survey last month and found that half of American students damage their smartphone during college.

By Kayla Matthews, Contributing Writer
08/07/2014

The stock market is incredibly complex. Intricate data provides detailed information on global financial decisions. The market is almost like an intimidating foreign language to those not involved in it.

One general trait of stock market mavens is that they know how to use the data available to them to intelligently forecast potential rises or dips in stock. This helpful data can come from a variety of sources, from intelligent analysis of recent news articles to analysis of the big data available on Google Trends. With Google Trends, it’s entirely possible to use certain information — like what people are searching for most frequently, or which topics are in decline — to forecast the stock market.

By Bob Wallace, Founder, Fast Forward Thinking LLC
08/07/2014

Five years ago last month, the government launched the “cash for clunkers” old car trade-in program, an approach that consumer electronics giant Samsung and BJs Wholesale Club resurrected on a far smaller scale as a means to entice consumers to trade in older TVs for savings on newer sets.

The Samsung-BJs three-week event offered up to $150 in additional savings on three tiers of TV models with 1080p HD resolution for consumers wo trade in old TVs, excluding wooden and projection sets, which many still be in use or gathering dust in their basements (or garages).

By Doug Mohney, Contributing Editor
08/07/2014

Sprint CEO Dan Hesse was replaced Wednesday, August 6. One narrative is crediting him for saving the Sprint-Nextel deal merger, but if that's an accomplishment worth bragging about, I'd hate to see what people call failure. Hesse may be a nice guy and well loved in certain media circles, but his record speaks for itself and about why he needed to be replaced sooner.

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