By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
07/21/2014

Starting July 21, 2014, Verizon FiOS residential customers will receive upload speeds that match their download speeds.

That is a significant change for Verizon, and many of you will rightly attribute the change to the need to respond to Google Fiber’s symmetrical bandwidth policies. But Verizon, which is seeing much higher take rates for faster access services, also seems to believe symmetrical bandwidth now is increasingly important to a growing percentage of customers.

By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
07/21/2014

The Seoul city government says it will ban Uber Technologies Inc., the latest example of how legacy transportation interests and local regulators are trying to prevent Uber and similar services from disrupting existing local public transportation businesses.

In some cases, the argument is a bit less radical. The argument being that Uber has to comply with all existing regulations applied to licensed taxicab businesses, for example. In Seoul, the effort is simply to ban Uber altogether.

By Joe Rizzo, TechZone360 Contributing Writer
07/18/2014

Over two years ago, the U.S. accused Apple, along with five of the nation’s largest publishers of conspiring to raise e-book prices. In a civil antitrust lawsuit, the Justice Department alleged that CEOs of the publishing companies met regularly in private dining rooms of upscale Manhattan restaurants to discuss how to respond to steep discounting of their e-books by Amazon.com Inc.

By Tara Seals, TechZone360 Contributor
07/18/2014

While awareness of TV Everywhere options and digital pay-TV extensions are growing, the monetization models have yet to catch up with the consumer momentum. However, pay-TV operators testing the multiscreen waters can leverage connected innovation going forward to ultimately uncover new revenue sources.

More or less half of U.S. pay-TV customers aged 18 to 64 are now aware of TV everywhere as a concept, according to CTAM research. That survey also showed that 44 percent of MVPD customers have verified into the service at least once to view TV content in the past six months—a notable groundswell for usage.

By Peter Bernstein, Senior Editor
07/18/2014

In the course of my daily scanning of tech news, a headline on Reuters caught my eye. It reads, “Smartphone suit against Google plays into rivals' hands.” Remembering that the suit was filed back in May, I figured this was a great time to see if something major was brewing in the case. Interestingly, after reviewing the posting by Dan Levine, the answer is both yes and no. The reason for this not being an instance for a definitive answer is based on whether the context is a short or long-term perspective. Let me explain.

By Bob Wallace, Founder, Fast Forward Thinking LLC
07/18/2014

Having lost its Supreme Court case vs. the big broadcasters who wanted over-the-air (OTA) TV streamer Aereo erased from the video industry, it now appears that both sides stand to win big if the company receives the full clearances it needs to become what it long argued it wasn’t – a cable TV service provider.

A double victory rising from a devastating Supreme Court ruling is unprecedented, but could be reality for Aereo, which if it pays retransmission fees for broadcaster content that it refused to do as part of its business plan, could greatly help itself and its once bitter enemies.

By Peter Bernstein, Senior Editor
07/17/2014

The news that Microsoft’s new CEO Satya Nadella is taking the axe to the Microsoft work force and the bulk of planned layoffs, estimated at 18,000 employees, will come from eviscerating the Nokia Device unit by 12,500 people, is not exactly a surprise. As my colleague Steve Anderson reported, while this move is likely to be the largest workforce “realignment” in Microsoft’s history it is not the first time, and more could be coming. In addition, Nadella had sent not very subtle signals in a July 10 email, Bold Ambition & Our Core,” to all Microsoft employees tipped his hand that this was coming.

By Doug Mohney, Contributing Editor
07/17/2014

Voice over LTE (VoLTE) generates a lot of hate among IP communications pundits. A recent Twitter exchange I had around VoLTE verses OTT quickly degenerated into a one-sided rant from the other party listing different ways VoLTE could go wrong when trying to make a phone call. I'm no big fan of VoLTE, but there is a near-messianic hate of the technology. I'd like to see people grow up a bit when they discuss it, rather than devolving into a knee jerk rant about the evils of the old style phone world.

By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
07/17/2014

No rules are better than these rules, Netflix argues in its filing on proposed Federal Communications Commission network neutrality rules, reiterating a call for Title II regulation, which would be a historic and major change of framework.

AT&T has argued recently that Title II rules are unnecessary and would, in any case, not prevent practices network neutrality supporters oppose.

Title II common carrier regulation represent the polar opposite positions in the present network neutrality rulemaking.

By Steve Anderson, Contributing TechZone360 Writer
07/17/2014

One of the most universal precepts ever devised by man is the precept known as Murphy's Law. Though it's been said dozens of different ways over the years—some believe the law goes as far back as the 1800s—it boils down to the same essential concept: whatever can go wrong, will go wrong. Over those same decades, there have been plenty of chances for Murphy's Law to get proven out, and a new report from MeriTalk shows that, indeed, the more complex a network is, the higher the chances exist for something within that network to go very wrong.

By Clayton Hamshar, Contributing Writer
07/16/2014

With smartglasses finally on the market, Google has moved on to the next frontier: contact lenses. These devices are different, however, in the fact that they are focused more on medical functionality rather than communication.

Google has teamed up with Novartis, a large healthcare corporation known for being the parent company of contact lens manufacturer Alcon, to take the microelectronics technology and apply it to actual lenses. Alcon will license the lenses and develop various medical applications.

By Peter Bernstein, Senior Editor
07/16/2014


Okay, so the news that Apple and IBM have formed what is called “The MobileFirst partnership” really took the entire ICT world by storm. As has been widely covered, the revelation that the two historic arch rivals have been working together on a venture, designed to produce “made for business” apps for exclusive use on iPhones and iPads, that leverage Apple’s hardware and software knowhow with IBM’s big data and analytics expertise, is really big news.

While no financial terms of the new venture were disclosed, we do know from Apple CEO, Tim Cook, and IBM CEO, Virginia M. Rometty, that:

By Kayla Matthews, Contributing Writer
07/16/2014

Big data has seen some of the hottest startups this year, and that trend looks to continue well into 2015. In fact, IDC expects the market to reach $32.4 billion by 2017.

Those numbers include startups of every shape and form, from the medical industry to the tech and innovation sphere. I’ve compiled a list of the coolest and most noteworthy startups so far in 2014:

By Peter Bernstein, Senior Editor
07/16/2014

Only a few days ago, the public-private partnership MeriTalk released a study that found that the U.S. federal government could save billions of dollars over the next ten years if it improved their management of copies of non-production data. Well the good folks at MeriTalk have released a new report, “The Federal Simplicity Report: Navigating Network Complexity,” that is sure to raise some eyebrows.

What is interesting is the study comes on the heels of SAP’s Sapphire Now show a few weeks ago where the message from SAP CEO Bill McDermott was “Make it Simple!” In fact, simplicity he stated was going to be the foundation upon which SAP would build its future success.

By Steve Anderson, Contributing TechZone360 Writer
07/16/2014

For anyone who's ever seen movies like “Super Hybrid” or “Christine,” the idea that a car could somehow become a killing machine of its own accord is only somewhat outlandish for the fact that said viewer has already seen the concept. But the FBI isn't concerned about aliens that only look like cars, or cars possessed by formerly deceased owners; the FBI is concerned that the self-driving car could ultimately prove a ‘lethal weapon’ in years to come.

By Adam Brandt, Web Editor
07/15/2014

In a world of seemingly endless cybertheft, fear and terror, history will perennially hold record of July 15, 2014, a day in which we bear witness to the formation of the first privatized internet police force.

Headed up by Google in what they have termed ‘Project Zero’, the sole purpose of this task force is the pursuit and eradication of any and all online threats, both internally and externally. As eluded to by Chris Evans, a member of the Project Zero team, sophisticated cybercriminals are a very real threat, seeking out very real security vulnerabilities.

By Rob Enderle, President and Principal Analyst, Enderle Group
07/15/2014

It is never a good policy to allow a practice that leaves a bad taste for customers. As long as customers get a good value from what they spend, they’ll keep coming back - but leave a bad taste for a customer only once, and they have a high probability of becoming an ex-customer forever because they stop trusting you and getting trust back, once lost, is pretty impossible. Currently, the FTC and Amazon are locked into a battle with regard to in-app purchases and while I can understand that Amazon doesn’t want any government agency to dictate their business model, in this case, customers are the ones being short changed and if that doesn’t stop, Amazon will have more to worry about than just the FTC.

By Tara Seals, TechZone360 Contributor
07/15/2014

Consumers continue to indulge in an ongoing love affair with TV, especially as digital set-top boxes, catch-up TV and on-demand services enrich the living-room environment. In fact, research firm TNS recently found that 75 percent of respondents in a survey said they sit in front of the box every day. ‘TV dinners’ are also alive and well, with three out of four viewers (76 percent) giving TV their undivided attention while eating in. But, online TV viewing is inexorably growing, and is often complementary to the old-school boob tube experience. Going forward, these trends have major implications for advertisers, who will need to gain the interest of viewers across screens.

By Steve Anderson, Contributing TechZone360 Writer
07/15/2014

No one likes to hear about the concept of layoffs. Layoffs have a huge human cost that's tough to bear—particularly for those who endure said layoffs—and a cost that extends outward into the community. So with that in mind, it's particularly disastrous to hear new reports that, not only is Microsoft said to be considering layoffs, but the largest single block of layoffs ever in the company's history.

By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
07/15/2014

Though it is early to specify what characteristics future fifth generation (5G) mobile networks will feature, at least some think 5G will be the first next-generation mobile network with a specific applications focus and the first mobile platform that erases performance differences with fixed networks.

It is hard to say how much of that change will be based on mobile network performance - but it should be about a thousand times better than what was possible in 2010 - or how much that result occurs because all networks will interoperate, allowing all devices to connect to, and use, whatever resources are available.

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