Amazon to Add Page Numbers to Books on Kindle

By Susan J. Campbell February 08, 2011

Competitors are trying to outshine the Kindle e-reader, and Amazon keeps adding tweaks to make it better. The online retailer is now enhancing the software to include a few new features, including real page numbers, according to a Business Insider report.

The page numbers will replace Kindle Location information, brining the e-reader even closer to the standard book experience. According to Amazon, customers have reported that they want real page numbers that match the page numbers in print books. This capability makes it easier to reference and cite pages, as well as read alongside others in a book club or class.

In the past, page numbers have been added to e-books that don’t correspond to print books. While that may be fine in an environment where the book is not available through any other source, it is not conducive to collaborating with others in both print and digital formats.

Amazon notes that they have already added real page numbers to tens of thousands of Kindle books, including the top 100 bestselling books in the Kindle Store with matching print editions and thousands of other popular books.

The online retailer also promises that page numbers will also be available on their free “Buy Once, Read Everywhere” Kindle apps in the coming months.

Amazon has garnered much attention as of late, with much activity taking place on its site and throughout its market offerings. TechZone360 reported just last week that the company is on the verge of offering "free," unlimited video streaming to its Prime members, who pay $79.99 a year for free two-day shipping on many items sold on Amazon.

The company also recently added Oracle Web services. According to Amazon, customers with existing Oracle licenses will be able to run Oracle Databases on Amazon RDS without the burden of additional software licensing or support charges. For customers that don’t have existing Oracle licenses, on-demand hourly licensing will be available and they won’t be charged upfront fees or have to make a long-term commitment.

Amazon has also garnered attention for its request for sales tax exemption in the state of Tennessee. Late last year, the state made an aggressive pitch to Amazon to try and convince the company to develop a large distribution center within its borders. As part of the proposal, Tennessee would provide Amazon with free land, job training and $12 million in property-tax breaks, among other incentives.

Susan J. Campbell is a contributing editor for TechZone360 and has also written for To read more of Susan’s articles, please visit her columnist page.

Edited by Tammy Wolf

TechZone360 Contributing Editor

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