Android Users Less Likely to Use Wi-Fi

By Michelle Amodio April 03, 2012

Androids and iPhones. Analysts love comparing the two in every way, and so another study reveals that Android users are less likely to use Wi-Fi versus their iPhone counterparts.

comScore found that more iPhone owners log in to Wi-Fi networks than their Android-using peers, especially in the UK.

“A U.S. analysis of Wi-Fi and mobile Internet usage across unique smartphones on the iOS and Android platforms reveals that 71 percent of all unique iPhones used both mobile and Wi-Fi networks to connect to the Internet, while only 32 percent of unique Android mobile phones used both types of connections,” the company said.

The survey results form comScore also include carriers whose struggles lay in keeping up with increasing demands for data.

“As bandwidth usage increases and the spectrum becomes more scarce, operators, OEMs, and others in the mobile ecosystem should understand the different dynamics between the use of mobile and Wi-Fi networks to develop strategies to optimize resources and provide their customers with continued high-quality network service,” Serge Matta, comScore president of Operator and Mobile Solutions said in a statement.

In the US, smartphones on the AT&T network were more likely to use Wi-Fi than those on other major operator networks, likely due to AT&T having both a greater iPhone market share and the largest Wi-Fi hotspot network in America. In the UK, smartphones on the Vodafone, Telefonica and Orange networks were more likely to use Wi-Fi than were others on other UK operators.

TechZone360 recently ran a report discussing one reason iOS should be preferable over Android.

A study from Spaceport.io reveals that iOS is better for HTML5 gaming, as it can run games three times faster than Android.

“The iPhone 4S scored 252 of these bad boys, while the iPad had a score of 327 PerfMarks. Samsung's Galaxy Nexus phone, which runs on Android, scored only 147. Amazon's Kindle Fire totally blew the test by scoring 25,” writes the report.

The main part of the test wanted to see the capability of each operating system to animate images, which is the biggest factor affecting the speed at which games run.






Edited by Jennifer Russell

TechZone360 Contributor

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Related Articles

10 Benefits of Drone-Based Asset Inspections

By: Frank Segarra    1/15/2018

Although a new and emerging technology, (which is still evolving), in early 2018, most companies are not aware of the possible benefits they can achie…

Read More

VR Could Change Entertainment Forever

By: Special Guest    1/11/2018

VR could change everything from how we play video games to how we interact with our friends and family. VR has the power to change how we consume all …

Read More

Making Connections - The Value of Data Correlation

By: Special Guest    1/5/2018

The app economy is upon us, and businesses of all stripes are moving to address it. In this age of digital transformation, businesses rely on applicat…

Read More

3 Ways to Improve Your VR Projects

By: Ellie Martin    1/4/2018

There is no denying that VR is here and will most likely only increase in velocity as a terminal speed is yet to be even hypothesized. That is why it …

Read More

Alphabet to See Schmidt Step Down

By: Maurice Nagle    12/21/2017

In 2001, Google brought Eric Schmidt on board as CEO. To 10 years later become executive chairman, and continue to serve in this capacity through rest…

Read More