The Portable Party Guest: The Top Three Wireless Speakers for the Outdoors

By Brooke Neuman May 09, 2012

It’s that time of year again. Ladies grab your bikinis and boys start up those grills cause its summer time, and yes the living is easy.

When I think of summer, I think trips to the beach, major bbqs, and tailgating at concerts. On the long laundry list of things you need to bring on these excursions, a bundle of annoying cords and AC adapters shouldn’t be one of them. I’m sure everyone can attest to the annoying problem of rearranging your whole living room just to find an empty plug to hook up your music or blaring tunes outside your kitchen or car window in order to hear it outside. We’ve all been there, whether it’s country, rap, or pop that gets you fist pumping, we all want to enjoy our music freely outside.

Here are my top three wireless portable “boom boxes” that will rock your world.

  1. Jawbone’s “Big Jambox” Wireless Stereo Speaker: Jawbone, a varsity industry player in the speaker biz, is releasing Big Jambox, not to be mistaken for its step sister the Jambox, on May 15th.  This pint sized (2.7 lbs to be exact) contender can hook up to any Bluetooth audio source including smartphones, computers and tablets. Its 3D sound feature LiveAudio will have you thinking you’re at Madison Square Garden. It holds up to 15 hours of continuous use in a single battery charge, and also acts as a speakerphone. About the size of a brick, the model comes in different colors including red dot, white wave, and graphite hex. The price is $299.99.
  2. Bose’s “Soundlink Wireless Mobile Speaker”: Bose, the long time veteran in quality sound, powers its Soundlink Wireless Mobile Speaker which has the ability to stream music from any Bluetooth enabled device. And the Soundlink device stores the six most recently used Bluetooth devices into its memory.  At a mere three pounds, its sleek design features a nylon cover that folds down into a stand. Its lithium-ion battery is re-chargeable and lasts over three hours at high volume and eight hours at a normal level. The price is $299.95.
  3. Eton Corporation’s “Rukus Solar”: Eton Corporation, an eco-friendly leader in high performance, green- powered products, released its Rukus Solar sound system. Deadheads and Phish lovers rejoice, because this Bluetooth enabled sound system uses embedded solar panels to take the sun’s energy for power. With just six hours of direct sunlight, the device will be fully charged (it can also be charged with an AC adapter). The device also features a USB port that can charge your mobile devices on-the-go. The device also features an E Ink display, an easy to read display panel that displays Bluetooth information, battery life, and solar charge. The price is $150.

So next time you are heading to the great outdoors with your music, forget the annoying bundle of plugs and cords. Instead, go completely cordless and enjoy the sounds!




Edited by Jamie Epstein
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