Intel Survey Suggests Americans Can't Travel without Tech

By Rory Lidstone June 21, 2012

A recent survey commissioned by TNS and conducted by Intel, entitled "Intel Survey: Tech Norms for Travelers," suggests that American attitudes toward travel and technology are often negative. For example, the survey found that U.S. vacationers tend to feel anxious when travelling without their mobile devices and angry when they can't find a power source to charge their devices.

Strong feelings uncovered by the survey suggest that American travelers feel an emotional bond with their mobile devices. Some even feel calmer and less stressed when they have access to this technology on vacation.

The survey found specifically that 44 percent of U.S. travelers admitted to anxiety while traveling without a mobile computing device, while a whopping 87 percent of young adults (18-29 years old) feel happier when with their devices.

Most interestingly, respondents ranked losing their mobile device when traveling as more stressful than losing their wedding ring – 77 percent compared to 55 percent.

The number one annoyance for travellers with tech, however, was found to be what was dubbed "peeping-tech" behaviors. In other words, travelers don't like people peeking at the screen of their device while almost half of respondents said they fear device theft.

"With summer travel now in full swing, we find that many people have a few common must-have items on their trip packing lists – Ultrabook, tablet and laptop. The bond between travelers and their tech devices has strengthened greatly over the past few years with the explosion of instant information, entertainment and services conveniently available on the Web," Mike Fard, Intel Ambassador, said in a press release.

Many others go out of their way to stay connected while traveling, as 46 percent of respondents and 63 percent of young travellers, said they have compromised comfort and hygiene in favor of a power source to keep their device charged.

In May, Intel released a tech-related survey which found that most American adults find "digital over-sharing" to be a big problem online today.




Edited by Braden Becker

TechZone360 Contributing Writer

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Related Articles

Bloomberg BETA: Models Are Key to Machine Intelligence

By: Paula Bernier    4/19/2018

James Cham, partner at seed fund Bloomberg BETA, was at Cisco Collaboration Summit today talking about the importance of models to the future of machi…

Read More

Get Smart About Influencer Attribution in a Blockchain World

By: Maurice Nagle    4/16/2018

The retail value chain is in for a blockchain-enabled overhaul, with smarter relationships, delivering enhanced transparency across an environment of …

Read More

Facebook Flip-Flopping on GDPR

By: Maurice Nagle    4/12/2018

With GDPR on the horizon, Zuckerberg in Congress testifying and Facebook users questioning loyalty, change is coming. What that change will look like,…

Read More

The Next Phase of Flash Storage and the Mid-Sized Business

By: Joanna Fanuko    4/11/2018

Organizations amass profuse amounts of data these days, ranging from website traffic metrics to online customer surveys. Collectively, AI, IoT and eve…

Read More

Satellite Imaging - Petabytes of Developer, Business Opportunities

By: Doug Mohney    4/11/2018

Hollywood has programmed society into believing satellite imaging as a magic, all-seeing tool, but the real trick is in analysis. Numerous firms are f…

Read More