Love Staring at Yourself? Then Imagine What You Will Look Like in the Third Dimension

By Jamie Epstein November 13, 2012

The 3D or as I like to refer to it the third dimension industry is growing rapidly with 3D movies continually being released that are raking in the profits. Avatar, the acclaimed James Cameron sci-fi flick tops the list thus far, scoring nearly $2.5 billion in profits. Thus, it only makes sense that those seeing success with 3D in movies would bring this technology into the world of photography as well.

With that being said, this week the world’s first 3D photo booth was unveiled in Japan, enabling citizens to closely analyze themselves from every angle possible. Called the Omote 3D photo booth, CNET is reporting that it actually “creates action figure size versions of posing people.” Pretty freaking cool, right? Differing from those outdated photo booths you see at weddings and arcades that you can purchase low quality photos from for a few bucks, these 3D prints are a tad bit more costly yet much more detailed, coming in at around $265 for a four-inch figurine and even increasing to nearly $530 for an eight-inch statute of yourself.

Image via CNET

While this photo booth is proving to be the first of its kind, we are seeing adoption of 3D technology within other verticals such as printing. With the ability to be yours for only $1,000, the UP Mini 3D from Delta Micro Factory Corporation first made its debut back in June and can currently be purchased in only the country down under, known as Australia. Basically how it works is that you import a .STL file with the design that you want printed in the third dimension and then the product will “build the model on a removable platform made from a hard piece of perforated plastic. When completed, you use a lever tool to nudge away the plastic from the base and clean the base for the next run,” a recent piece revealed. You then need to visit a website such as www.thingiverse.com which displays multiple models you can select from and print.

This next generation offering can be leveraged to produce multiple products ranging from lamp shades, USB stick holders, plastic cups and tooth brush holders to baby safety locks, plastic bow ties and cars models. However, this review revealed the process is not as simple as it should be. Chris Griffith stated, “My first project was to create a bust. There's lots of ways to do this. The first involved using the free iPhone/iPad app version of Autodesk 123D Catch to snap about 20-30 photos of a subject sitting absolutely still taken from all different angles. The app then uploads the photos to Autodesk's server which then returns a 3D model.”

 He added, “I found this a precarious process. Uploading and downloading to the server was slow, and often timed out. And the resultant models were incomplete at the back. In particular 123D Catch had problems dealing with full heads of hair; it can't work out reference points for stitching photos into a 3D model.”

To view the 3D printing photo booth in person, be sure to attend The Eye of Gyre exhibition from November 24, 2012 to January 14, 2013 in Tokyo.




Edited by Amanda Ciccatelli

TechZone360 Web Editor

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