Scholastic: E-Books Gaining Ground Among Youth

By Steve Anderson January 14, 2013

Who says young people don't read anymore?

A recent report from Scholastic Inc., one of the biggest names in books for younger readers, says there's a kind of book that's gaining ground among young people out there, though given the format, the report may not be too big of a surprise – the e-book.  

The report, commissioned by Scholastic Inc., showed that in 2010, for kids running between nine and 17, only about 25 percent had read an e-book. But fast forward just two years and that number jumps to nearly one in two, with 46 percent having read an e-book.

Growth is comparatively assured, with half of the stragglers expressing an interest in reading an e-book.

There are, however, two key points to take away from the study. One, the study found that e-book reading kids aren't throwing over paper books for their electronic equivalent in any great numbers, as 80 percent of kids who have read an e-book also still read paper-based books.

Two, one of the biggest things pushing the availability of books for children in e-book format is the rise of tablets, especially the iPad.

We've known for some time that the e-book is generally on the rise. Electronic literature is currently pegged as responsible for 25 to 30 percent of total book sales. The growth of e-book creation tools is driving plenty more of them to the market; it's never been easier to be a published author on places like Amazon and the like.

There are a lot more e-books on the market than ever before, and in conjunction with that, many more devices that can handle the e-book platform. Though it's somewhat different with children's fare – most books geared toward children are heavy on illustrations and thus require a larger platform like tablets to show them – even this is changing somewhat.

Consider the rise in the young adult book market, properties like the "Twilight" saga and "The Hunger Games." These are geared toward a relatively younger market, and have found readers across all segments of society.

Putting these in e-book format is a smart idea that only boosts their appeal.

While "Goodnight Moon" or anything by Dr. Seuss may not play out so well on a smartphone screen, there's more than enough to show that e-books are gaining in all sectors, and the younger readers are no exception. There's likely to always be a place for the storybook, in its paper format, but there is also plenty of opportunity for the e-book and the e-book reader to gain ground as well.




Edited by Braden Becker

Contributing TechZone360 Writer

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Related Articles

What is IBM Watson Adding to the Practice of IT?

By: Doug Mohney    3/23/2017

I have seen the future of IT, but have yet to fully understand it. IBM's Watson cognitive computing push is going to drastically reshape how IT is run…

Read More

API Management Poised for Big Growth

By: Paula Bernier    3/22/2017

The API management market is forecast to be worth $2.665 billion by 2021, according to MarketsandMarkets. That's up from more than $606 million last y…

Read More

IBM Watson Aims to Improve Call Center, IVR CX

By: Paula Bernier    3/22/2017

At its IBM Interconnect event today, the tech giant is introducing the IBM Watson Voice Gateway. It can act as a cognitive self-service agent, directl…

Read More

The 3D Printer That Could Print Your Next House or Finish Trump's Wall in Two Months

By: Rob Enderle    3/21/2017

Not only could this 3D printer be used to rapidly rebuild a town devastated by a natural or manmade disaster, the resulting home could be better able …

Read More

How Twitter, Indiegogo and IBM Will Augment Executives and Politicians

By: Rob Enderle    3/20/2017

I think Twitter could become the showcase for what Ginni Rometty, IBM's CEO, was talking about when she said that IBM wasn't focused on replacing huma…

Read More