US Gov't to Decide on More Aggressive Responses to Cyber Attacks

By Rory Lidstone February 20, 2013

With the increasing frequency of cyber attacks — including a campaign of cyber theft linked to the Chinese government — the Obama administration has begun to develop more aggressive responses to the theft of U.S. government data and corporate trade secrets.

Measures expected to be announced today include fines and other trade actions against any country found guilty of cyber espionage.

Earlier in the week, Virginia-based cyber security firm, Mandiant, released details linking a secret Chinese military unit, the People's Liberation Army Unit 61398, in Shanghai, to years of cyber attacks against U.S. companies.

Military experts believe the People's Liberation Army's actions have been authorized by the highest levels of China's military.

The Chinese government, however, denies any involvement in the cyber attacks, which compromised more than 140 companies, calling Mandiant's report "deeply flawed."

But the report, which features details on three of the alleged hackers and photographs of one of the military unit's buildings in Shanghai, is obviously convincing enough that the U.S. government is considering taking more forceful action against China.

"If the Chinese government flew planes into our airspace, our planes would escort them away. If it happened two, three or four times, the president would be on the phone and there would be threats of retaliation," said Shawn Henry, former FBI executive assistant director, in a statement. "This is happening thousands of times a day. There needs to be some definition of where the red line is and what the repercussions would be."

China also claimed it has been a victim of hacking, citing a report from an agency under the Ministry of Information Technology and Industry, which states that in 2012 alone, foreign hackers used malicious software to seize control of 1,400 computers and 38,000 websites in the country.

A spokesperson from the Ministry, Hong Lei, added that the majority of these attacks originated in the U.S.

The Obama administration's measures today closely follow the news that the government recently approved pre-emptive cyber attacks if deemed necessary.




Edited by Braden Becker

TechZone360 Contributing Writer

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Related Articles

A WebRTC-like Standard for the Internet of Things? It's Complicated

By: Doug Mohney    1/13/2017

Building the connections for the Internet of Things (IoT) is challenging, since applications, services, and devices of all different shapes, sizes, an…

Read More

Dell Pushes IoT Boundaries with Latitude 7285

By: Steve Anderson    1/12/2017

Dell's new Latitude 7285 features WiTricity systems to work wirelessly, a principle similar to IoT operations.

Read More

Yahoo! Shakeup Drops Mayer, Changes Name

By: Steve Anderson    1/11/2017

Ahead of a sale to Verizon, Yahoo Inc. is poised to change its name, drop Marissa Mayer, and never be the same again.

Read More

How Amazon Reversed Microsoft's Strategy to Help Lenovo Create a Better Home AI

By: Rob Enderle    1/11/2017

At CES this past week, Lenovo made an interesting move by licensing the Alexa platform and building its own version of Amazon Echo called the "Smart A…

Read More

Will Space Exploration Soon Benefit from IoT Tech?

By: Kayla Matthews    1/11/2017

Apollo 11, the first spacecraft to successfully take human beings to the moon, had less computing power than the mobile phone you have in your pocket …

Read More