US Gov't to Decide on More Aggressive Responses to Cyber Attacks

By Rory Lidstone February 20, 2013

With the increasing frequency of cyber attacks — including a campaign of cyber theft linked to the Chinese government — the Obama administration has begun to develop more aggressive responses to the theft of U.S. government data and corporate trade secrets.

Measures expected to be announced today include fines and other trade actions against any country found guilty of cyber espionage.

Earlier in the week, Virginia-based cyber security firm, Mandiant, released details linking a secret Chinese military unit, the People's Liberation Army Unit 61398, in Shanghai, to years of cyber attacks against U.S. companies.

Military experts believe the People's Liberation Army's actions have been authorized by the highest levels of China's military.

The Chinese government, however, denies any involvement in the cyber attacks, which compromised more than 140 companies, calling Mandiant's report "deeply flawed."

But the report, which features details on three of the alleged hackers and photographs of one of the military unit's buildings in Shanghai, is obviously convincing enough that the U.S. government is considering taking more forceful action against China.

"If the Chinese government flew planes into our airspace, our planes would escort them away. If it happened two, three or four times, the president would be on the phone and there would be threats of retaliation," said Shawn Henry, former FBI executive assistant director, in a statement. "This is happening thousands of times a day. There needs to be some definition of where the red line is and what the repercussions would be."

China also claimed it has been a victim of hacking, citing a report from an agency under the Ministry of Information Technology and Industry, which states that in 2012 alone, foreign hackers used malicious software to seize control of 1,400 computers and 38,000 websites in the country.

A spokesperson from the Ministry, Hong Lei, added that the majority of these attacks originated in the U.S.

The Obama administration's measures today closely follow the news that the government recently approved pre-emptive cyber attacks if deemed necessary.

Edited by Braden Becker

TechZone360 Contributing Writer

Related Articles

Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk Square Off on Rocket Firsts

By: Doug Mohney    11/25/2015

On Monday, November 23, Blue Origin successfully flew the first fully reusable rocket into space, giving the company first bragging rights. Founder Je…

Read More

Autonomous Car Technology Takes New Leap Forward With Ford, Uber

By: Larry Alton    11/24/2015

The age of the self-driving car is nearly upon us, or at least that's what major technology and automotive companies are hoping. There have been major…

Read More

Unusual but Fun Tech Ideas for 2015

By: Rob Enderle    11/24/2015

Well, it's the week of the big sales, and many of us are planning to buy that special someone a special something. I figured I'd join my peers and poi…

Read More

Locus Telecommunications is Challenging the FCC's Authority, Claiming Due Process Violations

By: Special Guest    11/24/2015

One of a handful of prepaid calling card companies slapped with a $5 million fine by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission) for its…

Read More

Kaspersky: Three Out of Four Users Have Trouble Spotting Big Threats

By: Steve Anderson    11/23/2015

We all know that spending on cybersecurity has been on the rise lately, as everyone from major corporations to military groups ramp up their cyberdefe…

Read More