Netflix to Boost Streaming Quality While Reducing Bandwidth Needs

By Rory Lidstone December 22, 2015

For those that remember the early days of media streaming on the internet, today’s smooth access to high-quality, high resolution video is borderline magical. Take Netflix, for example. The popular web streaming service is readily available from practically any device—from mobile phones to every major gaming console—and it’s able to deliver content with few hiccups to users all over the world, even those stuck with low bandwidth internet access. And yet, according to the latest reports, Netflix feels it can do better.

Four years ago, the folks at Netflix asked themselves a simple question with a complicated answer: How do we make our video look better while using less data? In the time since, a team of coders have come up with the answer: a smarter, better compression method.

This change comes just as the 4K Ultra HD pieces are beginning to fall into place. Netflix may not mention 4K streaming as a motivation for this change, but it will certainly prove useful as 4K content becomes more common in the coming years.

You may have already noticed that Netflix dynamically alters the bitrate of video depending on your connection’s capabilities. Those on a slow DSL connection, for example, will consistently see lower resolution video at a lower bitrate. It might not be noticeable if you have a steady connection but, from time to time, every Netflix user has experienced sudden drops in quality as the Netflix “recipe,” as the company calls it, adapts to current available bandwidth.

Now, Netflix has improved upon this tried and true formula through a greater understanding of the content it offers. Engineers discovered that different content has different requirements. The main example given is something visually simple like ‘My Little Pony’ as opposed to something more complex, like ‘The Avengers.’

Cartoons tend to feature large patches of color, which don’t need a very high bitrate to look good. And so, starting in 2016, Netflix will alter its recipe on a per-show basis, allowing certain titles to come through in 1080p quality while using lower bitrates, and lower bandwidth.

So, to achieve a crisp 1080p on Netflix’s old algorithm, a certain movie may require a bitrate of close to 6000 kbps. With the new algorithm, the company can achieve the same quality at closer to 4500 kbps, reducing bandwidth needs by around 20 percent. Not only does the user benefit, but so do Netflix’s servers.




Edited by Kyle Piscioniere

Contributing Writer

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Related Articles

UAV Growth, Challenges, and the Future

By: Frank Segarra    5/4/2018

Despite the growing opportunities in the drone industry, challenges still exist that may hamper or prevent the level of growth forecasted by industry …

Read More

Mitel Going Private, Managed Services Giant with Rackspace on the Horizon?

By: Erik Linask    4/26/2018

Mitel is once again in the news. The 45-year-old communications provider has been on the buying end of multiple transactions in its quest to transform…

Read More

Four Reasons to Reach for the Cloud after World Earth Day

By: Special Guest    4/23/2018

The World Earth Day agenda offers a chance to flip the rationale for cloud adoption and highlight environmental benefits that the technology brings pr…

Read More

Bloomberg BETA: Models Are Key to Machine Intelligence

By: Paula Bernier    4/19/2018

James Cham, partner at seed fund Bloomberg BETA, was at Cisco Collaboration Summit today talking about the importance of models to the future of machi…

Read More