Group Hacks Goldman Sachs, Posts Personal Information of Company's CEO

By Oliver VanDervoort September 28, 2011

Perhaps Goldman Sachs should have followed Facebook’s lead. Perhaps they did and it just didn’t matter. The anger aimed at some of the biggest financial companies in the world has never been worse than it is right now on a global scale. This afternoon it was revealed that Goldman Sachs had been hacked a group identifying itself as CabinCr3w. This group then posted personal identification information of many of the organization’s big wigs. One of those big wigs was Goldman’s CEO Lloyd Blankfein.

The hacker group issued a tweet that pointed its followers to the website, Pastebin. There Blankfein’s age and education were posted along with some of his recent addresses and legal actions Blankfein was engaged in. The group also posted the name and executive titles of 80 different Goldman employees. CabinCr3w used Pastebin because the site allows people to post any text you want anonymously for a certain period of time. This of course makes it harder to trace back the people who actually committed the hack to those who were actually posting the information.

Hacking has become one of the biggest and best known crimes of the 21st century. The only crime that would be more recognized than large amounts of hacking would be based in economic crimes, making this particular episode rather ironic. CabinCr3w has tweeted before that they are both a part of anonymous and affiliated with the group that is “Occupying” Wallstreet.

It should be noted that it is possible that those actively engaged in the “Occupy Wallstreet” movement may not be very happy to have someone committing criminal acts on their behalf. Those who are camped out in downtown New York have been taking the message to the public that they aren’t actually committing a crime but are just trying to show their displeasure with the Wall Street companies that aided in the collapse of the American economy. Goldman Sachs has been singled out as one of those companies thanks to their role in the TARP bailouts after the stock market crashed in 2008. So far, Goldman has not issued a comment as to their reaction or how their database was hacked.




Edited by Rich Steeves

Contributing Writer

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