Amazon Takes Route 53 to the Cloud

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Waiting days to set up a new domain name can be a painstaking exercise. Now Amazon plans to resolve that dilemma with a new service that promises to rapidly create DNS files for domain name owners.

Dubbed Route 53, the Web service essentially translates easy-to-read domain names like www.techzone360.com into the numeric IP addresses like 192.0.2.1 that computers use to connect to each other. According to Amazon’s website, “Route 53 effectively connects user requests to infrastructure running in Amazon Web Services (AWS) – such as an Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instance, an Amazon Elastic Load Balancer, or an Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) bucket – and can also be used to route users to infrastructure outside of AWS.”

Route 53 helps out in two ways. First, the service lets users manage the IP addresses listed (a.k.a. DNS records) for their domain names in the Internet’s DNS phone book. Second, like a directory assistance service, Route 53 responds to requests to translate specific domain names into their corresponding IP addresses, otherwise known as ‘queries’.

How does Route 53 work? The service essentially responds to DNS queries with low latency by using a global network of DNSservers. As a result, queries for a domain are instantly routed to the nearest DNS server, and then answered with “the best possible performance,” according to Amazon. “With Route 53, you can create and manage your public DNS records with an easy-to-use API. It’s also integrated with other Amazon Web Services. For instance, by using the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) service with Route 53, you can control who in your organization can make changes to your DNS records,” reads the Internet giant’s website.

The pricing is also certain to thrill domain name owners. Like most cloud computing services, Route 53 doesn’t require users to commit to a long-term contract or minimum usage requirements for using Route 53. Subscribers simply pay only for managing domains through the service and the number of queries that the service answers. 




Edited by Tammy Wolf

TechZone360 Contributing Editor

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