Ovum Reveals Employee Behavior and Attitude Differences between High Growth and Mature Markets

By Tabitha Naylor November 29, 2012

Ovum reveals that compared to those in mature markets, employees in high-growth markets are more willing to embrace the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) phenomenon and the personal productivity benefits of enterprise mobility. The tendency of professionals in high-growth markets to “live to work” and the lower rate of corporate provision of mobile handsets and tablets is driving this trend.

As part of the largest study ever conducted into employee BYOD behavior and attitudes, a new paper from Ovum reveals that across 17 markets, 57.1 percent of full-time employees engage in some form of BYOD.

Yet, when broken down by market, there is a clear trend that shows that compared to 44 percent in more mature markets, 75 percent of respondents in the emerging, “high-growth” markets (including Brazil, Russia, India, UAE, and Malaysia) demonstrate a much higher propensity to use their own devices at work.

Richard Absalom, consumer impact IT analyst at Ovum stated that employees in high-growth, emerging economies are demonstrating a more flexible attitude to working hours, and are happy to use their own devices for work. However, employees in mature markets have settled into comfortable patterns of working behavior and are more concerned about the separation of their work and personal domains.

“This bifurcation in behavior will shape not just future patterns of enterprise mobility in high-growth markets compared to mature markets, but also dictate which markets, structurally, are going to benefit most from this revolution in how and where we work,” added Absalom

With 79 percent believing that constant connectivity to work applications enables them to do their jobs better, compared to 53.5 percent in mature markets, Ovum’s research also suggests that employees in high-growth markets see BYOD as way to get ahead in their careers. Spain is a notable anomaly to this trend, where 62.8 percent of employees bring their own devices to work, well above the developed market mean.




Edited by Rich Steeves

Contributing Writer

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Related Articles

Pebble Drops Race, Moves to Fitbit

By: Steve Anderson    12/8/2016

Pebble offers confirmation that it's pulling up stakes in the wearable tech race, and moving lock, devs and software to Fitbit.

Read More

SoftBank CEO Cozies Up to Trump

By: Paula Bernier    12/7/2016

SoftBank Group founder and CEO Masayoshi Son, who is also Sprint's chairman, told President-elect Donald Trump he wants to create 50,000 new U.S. jobs…

Read More

Predicting the FCC's Path Forward Under President-Elect Donald Trump

By: Special Guest    12/6/2016

President-elect Donald J. Trump will become the 45th President of the United States of America on January 20, 2017. Many in the tech, media and teleco…

Read More

From Social Media to Sour Media in 2016

By: Doug Mohney    12/5/2016

Lost all patience with re-written news with misleading headlines? How many people have you un-friended over the last twelve months on Facebook? Been a…

Read More

The Five Core Components of Proactive Cybersecurity

By: Special Guest    12/5/2016

As technically astute and often well-funded hackers continue to deploy new, constantly evolving techniques, organizations are too often focusing their…

Read More