Mobile Broadband Drives Growth in 17 Countries

By Gary Kim December 14, 2012

Mobile broadband is driving revenue growth, while voice revenue is declining in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, the United States, Canada, Japan, Australia, Spain, the Netherlands, Sweden, Ireland, Poland, Brazil, Russia, India and China in 2011, according to a study by Ofcom, the United Kingdom communications regulator.

Fixed voice revenue fell by an average of 7.3 percent in 2011, compared to a 7.1-percent decrease in 2010.

Mobile data has seen the fastest growth rate, with a compound annual growth rate of 25.4 percent between 2006 and 2011.

As a result, for the first time in 2011, overall mobile data revenues exceeded fixed broadband revenue in the 17 countries.

At the country level, though, only in three of the countries does mobile data revenue exceed fixed broadband revenues (United States, Japan and Australia).

Mobile services represent 61 percent of total service provider revenue, overall.

Still, fixed broadband accounted for 39 percent of total fixed telecom service provider revenue in 2011, ranging from 25 percent in Ireland to 55 percent in France.

Across all 17 countries as a whole, fixed broadband represents about 13 percent of total communications service provider revenue, including all mobile and fixed services.

But fixed voice still represents 25 percent of total service provider revenue.

Fixed voice revenue fell by 5.2 percent in the United Kingdom during 2011 – a higher rate that the 3.3-percent average in the five years to 2011.

Fixed voice call volumes also fell in all of the countries for which figures were available in 2011, except France.

Growth in the fixed voice market in France was largely a result of high uptake of managed VoIP services.

The fastest rates of fixed voice pricing decline are being found in the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) countries, with revenue falling by 17.8 percent in China and 15.3 percent in India. Among the non-BRIC countries, annual falls in revenue were highest in Poland (13.3 percent) and France (13.1 percent).

The total number of fixed lines among the 17 countries fell by 4 percent to 767 million in 2011. The number of lines fell in all of these countries (except Brazil and the U.K.), where the number of lines increased by two percent and 0.2 percent, respectively.




Edited by Braden Becker

Contributing Editor

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Related Articles

500M Yahoo! Users Impacted by Hack; What It Says About Password Protection

By: Paula Bernier    9/23/2016

Yahoo! is facing a lot of challenges lately. Add to the heap the breach - which the company confirmed today - that has affected 500 million Yahoo! acc…

Read More

From Robotic Friends to Flying Cars: Looking Ahead to 2025

By: Rob Enderle    9/22/2016

I'm at the IBMEdge conference this week, and one of the topics that came up at lunch today was how robotics are going to dramatically change how and w…

Read More

Windows 10: Is it Worth the Update?

By: Alicia Young    9/22/2016

Last summer, Microsoft shook up their Windows design with the release of Windows 10. They offered the update to users for free for a year, giving ever…

Read More

Apple Making Serious Push Into Car Industry

By: Andrew Bindelglass    9/22/2016

Over the past two years, Apple has been seriously looking into entering the connected car industry, attempting to build its own electric vehicle that …

Read More

Will Legacy Paper Save Us From Electronic Fraud?

By: Doug Mohney    9/21/2016

Voting in the 2016 elections may be under threat from hacking, with the FBI worried about interference by a foreign power. Every day, I and tens of th…

Read More