By Joe Rizzo, TechZone360 Contributing Writer
07/30/2014

I think that it is safe to say that when we think of venture companies and the money that they invest, we normally think about smaller startup technology companies as being on the receiving end. Without an influx of venture capital, a lot of these technology companies would never make it past their first year in business and actually produce a product.

By Peter Bernstein, Senior Editor
07/30/2014

We all know from reading the drum beat of headlines that both the frequency and sophistication of data breaches unfortunately continue to increase. Confirmation of just how ugly things are comes in the latest highlights (maybe a better word would be "details") contained in the release by security solutions provider SafeNet of not one but two surveys highlighting the level and nature of data breaches along with consumer attitudes about them.

By Joe Rizzo, TechZone360 Contributing Writer
07/30/2014

It seems that once again Microsoft is under examination in China. The Chinese government is investigating possible violations to its antitrust laws. The State Administration for Industry and Commerce, or SAIC as it is commonly referred to, is the authority in the People's Republic of China responsible for legislation concerning the administration of industry and commerce in China. It is the body responsible for enforcing business laws.

By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
07/30/2014

Sprint Corp. reported operating results for the first fiscal quarter of 2014, including net income of $23 million, the best performance in almost seven years when excluding non-cash transaction-related items from 2013, and consolidated operating income of $519 million, the highest in more than seven years, Sprint said.

By Casey Houser, Contributing Writer
07/29/2014

Apple is not normally seen as a leader in audio production. Nevertheless, it has moved one step closer to completely owning Beats, the ubiquitous headphone manufacturer that has gained a high level of popularity in recent years.

This week, according to a report at Engadget, the European Union approved the $3 billion merger of Apple and Beats. The court was reportedly concerned with the possibility that Beats would provide Apple with a monopoly on the headphone market in Europe, but it ultimately found that the combination of both companies would not sufficiently drive out other market competitors.

By Rob Enderle, President and Principal Analyst, Enderle Group
07/29/2014

Given how gushing Tim Cook was about the Apple IBM Partnership, and how interesting a merger might be between the firms, but how difficult would it be to pull off? For this reason, I wrote how you might structure such a deal using methods that EMC has pioneered in a way that would get the benefits of a merger but not the likely disastrous consequences—it wouldn’t even be that hard. My old buddy John C. Dvorak (THErealDvorak) thought the whole concept was stupid and commented that it would be like merging Apple and McDonalds, which got me thinking what a merger of Apple and McDonalds would look like.

By Matt Paulson, TechZone360 Contributing Writer
07/28/2014

Delivering the Internet at sea through satellite transponders has a surprisingly broad range of uses. Cruise liners often include Internet access as part of room service for their floating hotels, while Internet-aided tracking systems pinpoint the locations and movements of cargo ships in oceans all around the world. As a result, the bandwidth demand from maritime customers is rapidly expanding, to the point that Northern Sky Research predicts that there will be more than 160 satellite transponders in place by the year 2023.

By Clayton Hamshar, Contributing Writer
07/28/2014

A new app called PlaceUs focuses on group location sharing as well as contextual awareness to bring mobile location functionality to a new level. The startup is led by Sam Liang, who used to be a Maps architect for Google. It is designed for use within a close circle of friends or loved ones, like a much more limited and privatized version of FourSquare.

By Tara Seals, TechZone360 Contributor
07/28/2014

The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology has successfully deployed mobile broadband communications systems using white spaces with 40Mbps throughput, establishing a 3.7km link between two locations within London.

Based on the experiences and the results obtained from the trials, NICT plans to improve the performance of the devices and the database. NICT also expects to contribute these experiences to the development of white space relevant regulations in other countries, as well as to transfer their white space technologies to the stakeholders.

By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
07/28/2014

Even if there is some amount of posturing by U.S. Internet service providers about gigabit access services, the push undeniably is gaining momentum.

Time Warner now says, without providing specifics, that gigabit networks will be built in its service territories in the Los Angeles market. AT&T, likewise, is considering gigabit deployments in 21 major metropolitan areas. All of that activity, one might well argue, is because of Google Fiber.

By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
07/28/2014

Regulatory attorneys are always required to advance the strongest-possible arguments in favor of their firm’s or client’s interests, when the Federal Communications Commission or any other regulatory body is considering new rules.

So it is not surprising that Time Warner Cable’s filing with the FCC regarding notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) on the “Open Internet” opposes Title II regulation of access services, argues that fixed and mobile ISPs should be subject to the same rules, or argues network interconnection should not be included in the rules.

By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
07/28/2014

It often has been asserted -- not without reason -- that U.S. high speed access generally does not feature speeds as fast as those available in the world’s leading markets, such as South Korea. Rarely, if ever, has the United States actually ranked at the top of international metrics for Internet access speed or some other measures of telecommunications adoption.

Among the reasons, it has been argued, is that any particular service created in the United States must cover a continental-sized territory with a high percentage of remote, expensive locations to connect.

By Kayla Matthews, Contributing Writer
07/25/2014

Are you perplexed by the lack of viewership, comments or followers when it comes to your videos? While not every video is going to suddenly hit the Internet and become an overnight sensation, it is possible that the problem lies within some technical flaws related to the way that you’re presenting your videos. Below are five of the most common mistakes made by companies along with the solutions to fix them.

By Steve Anderson, Contributing TechZone360 Writer
07/25/2014

Some are already referring to the younger set of Brits as the “gadget generation,” and as is commonly the case, mom and dad are footing the bill. A new report from E.ON is showing just how far this development goes, and the available information shows that this particular bill is getting footed to a degree that some might not have envisioned before now, reaching a staggering combined annual total of 2.25 billion pounds sterling (about $3.82 billion U.S.).

By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
07/24/2014

Even if AT&T second quarter earnings predictably were lead by mobile segment gains, what is happening in the fixed network segment might strike some as more significant, given the pressures that segment faces.

Total second-quarter fixed network revenues were $14.6 billion, down 0.9 percent compared to the second quarter of 2014, but up 0.2 percent over the first quarter of 2014.

By Clayton Hamshar, Contributing Writer
07/24/2014

Hotel Wi-Fi Test is a company that specializes in collecting, analyzing, and distributing data about the quality of Wi-Fi in hotels around the world. Its main function is to perform comprehensive speed tests for various hotels and centralize this information in a database, which is then made available to travelers. However, the company has by no means managed to collect data for every hotel in the world so they have introduced a state-of-the-art machine learning algorithm to provide the best estimate possible for those that have yet to be tested.

By Bob Wallace, Founder, Fast Forward Thinking LLC
07/24/2014

Hoping to put the costly and extended failed experiment of 3D TV in the rearview mirror, the video industry is working hard to make ultra HD (aka 4K TV) a reality—despite the high cost of capable TV sets and a dearth of programming shot in the higher-resolution format.

Though it offers twice the resolution of 1080 HD by using four times as many pixels, UHD has a solid shot at success, but only if stakeholders in the movement think well beyond TV set price and 4K programming to address early on two questions of equal or greater importance.

By Steve Anderson, Contributing TechZone360 Writer
07/23/2014

Electricity probably has to be one of the greatest inventions mankind has ever realized. Opening the door to a host of devices that we use literally daily, electricity is the perfect “kilowatt slave,” as some like to refer to it. It asks little of us, and provides a great deal in return, from heating, to cooling, cooking, entertainment, and so much more. But electricity depends on a vast infrastructure to keep it operating to its fullest, and it's an infrastructure that's proving increasingly fragile. Google, in that way Google does, wants to change all that by getting more people generating power, and has launched the Little Box Challenge in a bid to fix that.

By Gary Kim, Contributing Editor
07/23/2014

Revenue sources really are changing in the U.S. access provider market. Whether that is a good thing or a bad thing is the issue. Cable operators might argue the persistence of video as the dominating revenue category is a good thing, as it shows ability to protect its market.

Telcos might argue that their more-rapid ability to replace former legacy revenue sources is a sign of agility. Others might note the Telco revenue sources have transformed because the voice market has deteriorated so much, and because Telcos were lucky to find mobile services so popular.

By Joe Rizzo, TechZone360 Contributing Writer
07/23/2014

I think that it is always interesting to see how the concept of what people want, or at least, what they think they want, changes from one extreme to another. This is something that is not isolated to one area or industry. At one point, people want something with a lot of options. More options means that it is a better product giving you more control, that is until the plethora of options becomes so great that people decide that simple, meaning less options is better and easier to use.

Never have I seen such an ebb and flow as with cell phones and smartphones. Back in the mid-1990s, the goal was to get the cell phone into as small a package as possible. I once knew someone who had a Motorola flip phone that was literally the size of a small matchbox. Of course, back then the only thing that the screen displayed was the incoming phone number and on a device that small, a three line display made it easier to read the number.

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