Google Removes Stolen Apps from Market

By Cindy Waxer March 02, 2011

Open your doors and you might be surprised by who – or what – walks in. That’s the lesson learned by Google, which recently had to remove publisher Myournet from its Android Market, along with its 21 trojan horse-bearing apps.

According to Android Police, Myournet and its ill-intentioned programmers borrowed pre-existing apps from fellow developers, inserted them with malicious code and then repackaged those apps as its own releases. The malware is capable of stealing all of the infected device’s data.

Reads a recent Android Police blog posting: “I asked our resident hacker to take a look at the code himself, and he’s verified it does indeed root the user’s device via rageagainstthecage or exploid. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg: it does more than just yank IMEI and IMSI. There’s another APK hidden inside the code, and it steals nearly everything it can: product ID, model, partner (provider?), language, country, and userID. But that’s all child’s play; the true pièce de résistance is that it has the ability to download more code. In other words, there’s no way to know what the app does after it’s installed, and the possibilities are nearly endless.”

Upon receiving notification from Android Police, Google immediately pulled the dangerous apps from its Android Market. However, the damage had already been done: nearly 200,000 downloads have been completed over the past four days.

Earlier this month, TechZone360.com reported Google’s unveiling of its Android Market Web store, which is the new version of its Android operating software, Honeycomb. Previously only accessible through use of an Android smartphone, you can now go to the Android Market site through a Web browser with other devices, including desktop computers, laptops, or tablets.

After logging into the site and signing in to your Google account, you can search through over 200,000- apps on the official Android Market, making app purchases through your browser. After purchasing, the apps will be installed directly to the desired smartphone device, using your choice of either WiFi or 3G connectivity.

Simply stated, you are still required to have an Android device to run the apps, but now you can download them to your device using a browser.




Edited by Tammy Wolf

TechZone360 Contributing Editor

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Related Articles

Looking For The Next iPod/Echo

By: Rob Enderle    4/29/2016

The Amazon Echo, not the Apple Watch, became the last iPod-like product largely because of a far more accessible price point, a more compelling name, …

Read More

Apple Needs Reset, Not Elon Musk

By: Doug Mohney    4/29/2016

Apple's 13 percent sales decline and subsequent stock price drop this week has lead to the usual crazy talk about how to "fix" the company. Vivek Wadh…

Read More

Is the Apple Bubble Finally Bursting?

By: Andrew Bindelglass    4/28/2016

Over the past 13 years, Apple has been one of the most successful companies in the world of tech, posting sales growths in 51 straight quarters. That …

Read More

Shared-Space Providers (Airbnb) Poised to Beat Ride-Sharers (Uber)

By: Steve Anderson    4/28/2016

Travel may be starting to make a bit of a comeback, as a new report suggests that shared-space providers like Airbnb and WeWork are on the rise.

Read More

Facebook Wants More Sharing, Building New Camera App to Drive It

By: Steve Anderson    4/28/2016

One of the great downsides to having a lot of content in any one place is that, after a while, it starts looking downright pointless to add more.

Read More