Don't Be a Fool in the Rain! Research Environmental Conditions on Your Smartphone

By

Nowadays, many people depend on their phones for everything from receiving the latest status updates on Facebook, to paying bills online, to buying those newly released pair of Jordans, to checking the weather for the upcoming and long awaited weekend. But what if you never needed to go to Weather.com again and instead could just refer to your smartphone to tell you what the humidity and barometric pressure will be for the following day?

Pretty cool idea, right? In all fairness, the credit goes to Michael Halbherr, EVP of Location and Commerce at Nokia, who revealed in a recent interview that he predicts these new electronic sensors will soon be accessible via your mobile device.

You may be asking yourself why would someone really care about humidity and pressure as opposed to if the sun will be a’shining or the rain will be a’pouring on your first day off in what feels like years? And the reason is because these two important factors can tell you what the weather will be like.

Halbherr commented, “We could create super-accurate weather forecasts if sensors in phones were recording this data. Today meteorologists collect data from dispersed weather stations, limiting their ability to generate accurate and precise forecasts. But if millions of phones were transmitting real-time barometric pressure and air moisture readings, tagged with geo-location data, then the art of weather predication could become much more a science.”

In other weather and technology news, drone technology is now being leveraged to carefully analyze the patterns of hurricanes. In fact right now, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is utilizing two new remote-controlled boats named Emily and Wave Glider, an article revealed.

Touted as a small boat with instruments everywhere, Emily will be put directly in the path of a hurricane in the Atlantic or the Gulf with the goal of recording readings of the weather and the waves for approximately 10 days. The lady boat also boats a high-definition camera.  In comparison, Wave Glider is also a droid watercraft, has a video camera on board, but it doesn’t need any gas. Instead, it will use energy it receives from the movement of ocean waves and transition it into thrust. This will enable the boat to stay afloat for many months.

With these boats sailing around the ocean blue, us humans will gain an in depth perspective into how to identify when a hurricane is coming to protect citizens. And by using your smartphone to see the weather for tomorrow, you never have to worry about endangering the life of your favorite pair of stilettos ever again.




Edited by Brooke Neuman
Get stories like this delivered straight to your inbox. [Free eNews Subscription]

TechZone360 Web Editor

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Related Articles

Web3 in 2024 - What's the Story So Far?

By: Contributing Writer    2/26/2024

Is Web3 a thing yet? Click here to learn about the 2024 Web3 story so far.

Read More

Shabodi Accelerates Adoption of Network-Aware Applications with CAMARA API Enterprise Reference Implementation

By: Special Guest    2/16/2024

Shabodi, an Application Enablement Platform (AEP) provider unleashing advanced network capabilities in LTE, 5G, 6G, and Wi-Fi 6, announced they have l…

Read More

How Much Does Endpoint Protection Cost? Comparing 3 Popular Solutions

By: Contributing Writer    2/2/2024

Endpoint protection, also known as endpoint security, is a cybersecurity approach focused on defending computers, mobile devices, servers, and other e…

Read More

What Is Databricks? Simplifying Your Data Transformation

By: Contributing Writer    2/2/2024

Databricks is an innovative data analytics platform designed to simplify the process of building big data and artificial intelligence (AI) solutions. …

Read More

What Is Blue/Green deployment?

By: Contributing Writer    1/17/2024

Blue/green deployment is a software release management strategy that aims to reduce downtime and risk by running two identical production environments…

Read More