Intel Addressing Semiconductor Challenge with $20B Silicon Heartland Facility

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Semiconductors are critical to the foundations of the U.S. economy. During the global shutdown due to the pandemic, consumers saw how critical the chips are as the demand for digital technology rose, both in business and consumer markets. Retail shelves were empty, online stores didn’t have stock either, car dealership lots were empty and used car prices skyrocketed – basically anything that requires a chip stood a good chance of being delayed due to supply shortages.

It stands to reason that, as Intel believes, investment into the U.S. chipmaking ecosystem will benefit the U.S. economy and restore some balance to the global semiconductor supply chain. Riding that belief, Intel broke ground in Silicon Heartland in Ohio and revealed the first phase of an education program to innovate and develop new capabilities with an emphasis on chipmaking.

The $20 billion-plus planned investment in a new semiconductor manufacturing site to produce chips is expected to generate 7,000 construction jobs and 3,000 long-term positions in manufacturing and engineering.

The Ohio investment will build on the company’s announcement to build two new fabs in Arizona and its expansion in New Mexico to add advanced packaging capabilities, ultimately expanding the company’s U.S. “lab-to-fab” pipeline.

“The establishment of the Silicon Heartland is testament to the power of government incentives to unlock private investment, create thousands of high-paying jobs, and benefit U.S. economic and national security,” said Pat Gelsinger, Intel CEO.

As for the first phase of funding for its Ohio Semiconductor Education and Research Program, Intel will provide $17.7 million for eight proposals from institutions and collaborators in Ohio to develop semiconductor-focused education and workforce programs.

Intel’s program will fund collaborative proposals led by the University of Cincinnati, Central State University, Columbus State Community College, Kent State University, Lorain County Community College, Ohio University and two from The Ohio State University. These eight proposals involve more than 80 institutions of higher education across Ohio.

Intel expects this first phase of the program to produce around 9,000 graduates for the industry and provide more than 2,300 scholarships over a three-year period.

Intel's education and workforce program is one more step forward in Intel’s 2030 Goals and the company’s dedication to make technology fully inclusive and expand digital readiness worldwide.




Edited by Erik Linask

TechZone360 Editor

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