Microsoft Looking to Patent 1.4 Gigapixel Digital Camera

By

While some technophiles tend to ignore them, digital cameras are still a massively popular gadget in some circles. Carl Zeiss, one of the top camera makers in the country is joining forces with AT&T in order to lend their camera technology to smart phones. Mirrorless cameras are also becoming quite the rage. 

These particular devices are becoming so popular that Samsung recently announced they felt as though they might sell as many as 250,000 mirrorless cameras this year. Microsoft has apparently jumped into the digital camera business with both feet, if their latest patent application is any indication.

Last week, the computer giant applied for a patent for a 1.4 gigapixel camera that was impressive for not only the supposed resolution but also how the camera actually works. Perhaps you need to read that last sentence again. This is not a 1.4 mega pixel, but gigapixel. There are few devices, camera, or not that offer up that kind of resolution. 

This particular camera would have an astounding 4,096 charged-couple devices (CCDs) inside the camera’s housing. Each CCD would be capable of taking a 0.34 mega pixel photo. These CCD images would have an overlapping capability built into every image, so that when the actual picture is put together the images combine seamlessly. 

This camera will also have a secondary camera inside the body of the bigger one, which will help pull the images together to make those ultra-high resolution pictures. Finally, there will be a thermoelectric device inside the main camera in order to keep all of those CCDs cool. While this kind of a camera might be lost on the average photo enthusiast, these super high-resolution cameras do have a use. 

Photographing astronomical events as well as slight details in very small or very old objects will become much easier with these types of cameras. When Google put a digitized version of the Dead Sea Scrolls on the web recently, they used a high-resolution camera to do it. Of course, Google did not use a high-resolution camera this good to do it, because should Microsoft actually complete this task, it would be the first camera to offer these kinds of specs.






Edited by Jennifer Russell

Contributing Writer

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Related Articles

Coding and Invention Made Fun

By: Special Guest    10/12/2018

SAM is a series of kits that integrates hardware and software with the Internet. Combining wireless building blocks composed of sensors and actors con…

Read More

Facebook Marketplace Now Leverages AI

By: Paula Bernier    10/3/2018

Artificial intelligence is changing the way businesses interact with customers. Facebook's announcement this week is just another example of how this …

Read More

Oct. 17 Webinar to Address Apache Spark Benefits, Tools

By: Paula Bernier    10/2/2018

In the upcoming webinar "Apache Spark: The New Enterprise Backbone for ETL, Batch and Real-time Streaming," industry experts will offer details on clo…

Read More

It's Black and White: Cybercriminals Are Spending 10x More Than Enterprises to Control, Disrupt and Steal

By: Cynthia S. Artin    9/26/2018

In a stunning new report by Carbon Black, "Hacking, Escalating Attacks and The Role of Threat Hunting" the company revealed that 92% of UK companies s…

Read More

6 Challenges of 5G, and the 9 Pillars of Assurance Strategy

By: Special Guest    9/17/2018

To make 5G possible, everything will change. The 5G network will involve new antennas and chipsets, new architectures, new KPIs, new vendors, cloud di…

Read More